Discussion, Intonation and Pronunciation

InTuition Languages Pronunciation and Intonation, Teaching Ideas and Methodology (Applicable to all levels) Leave a Comment

Lena is a trainee English teacher so is an advanced student.   I found it was not necessary to do a lot of grammar.   We decided the more important topics were to improve her intonation and pronunciation and to give her more confidence in talking.  We did a lot of talking!   We read newspapers and had structured discussions on current events …

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Using Pronunciation in One-to-One

InTuition Languages Pronunciation and Intonation Leave a Comment

Observers of one‐to‐one English classes often say that there is one important area of the language, pronunciation, which is seldom taught, or even not taught at all. The absence of pronunciation teaching from one‐to‐one classrooms might, at first, seem rather surprising, given that the learner is unlikely to have a similar opportunity again, of experimenting and practicing the sounds of …

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Stress-timed and syllable-timed languages

InTuition Languages Learner Autonomy, Skills and Strategies, Pronunciation and Intonation, Teaching Ideas and Methodology (Applicable to all levels) 3 Comments

It is generally agreed that languages can be roughly divided into two categories: stress-timed and syllable-timed. As a definition of each, we can say that in syllable-timed languages, syllables tend to follow each other at regular intervals, with an equal amount of time being allocated for each syllable. In stress-timed languages, on the other hand, stresses tend to occur at …

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Exercise in Stress in Sentences

InTuition Languages Learner Autonomy, Skills and Strategies, Pronunciation and Intonation, Teaching Ideas and Methodology (Applicable to all levels) Leave a Comment

Individual words have a pattern of strong (stressed) syllables and weak (unstressed) syllables.  In sentences, we find a similar pattern of strong (stressed) and weak (unstressed) words.  Short sentences tend to have typical stress patterns: OooO What would you like? oOoo A coffee please. oO Coming up! oOoo How much is it? ooO Two pounds seventy. Oo How much? Match …

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Free Speech – 10 Steps to Integrating Pronunciation

InTuition Languages Pronunciation and Intonation, Teaching Ideas and Methodology (Applicable to all levels) Leave a Comment

Many learners of English are keen to ‘lighten’ or even lose their L2 accents.  They have various reasons, which perhaps include the aim of appearing more fluent in the language or being less conspicuous in wider society.  Perhaps their goal of minimizing an L2 accent is linked to a perception of attaining and maintaining a greater credibility when speaking in …

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More Ideas for Incorporating Pronunciation

InTuition Languages Pronunciation and Intonation, Teaching Ideas and Methodology (Applicable to all levels) Leave a Comment

Pronunciation does not have to be a separate activity in class.  You can direct your student’s attention to pronunciation in a variety of ways: Listen to recordings from text books, podcasts, computer downloads, etc. Then you can choose a short section and ask your student questions about the pronunciation and the accents, for instance: Do the recordings sound authentic, spontaneous …

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Substitution drilling and back-chaining

InTuition Languages Pronunciation and Intonation, Teaching Ideas and Methodology (Applicable to all levels) Leave a Comment

Although drilling has become quite unpopular over recent years, it is can be used effectively to practise / reinforce grammatical structures, word order and / or to practise stress, rhythm and intonation. Substitution drills and back-chaining or back-catenation can be incorporated easily into lessons and students seem to like the game element of having to concentrate and fit the new …

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